This Issue - July 2017

Follow us on LinkedIn for more updates throughout the month.

Sandra McCloud, CPA

Calculating Retirement Needs

  

A staple in retirement planning is the search for “your number.” That is, how much money do you need to accumulate in savings and investment accounts so you can afford to stop working? Life expectancy is increasing, so the amount you have when you retire might have to last for decades.

To find the number, you can start with a target for cash flow in retirement. Then determine how much you can expect from all anticipated sources of income: Social Security, a pension, rental income from investment property, and so on. The gap will probably be filled from your financial resources.

Example 1: Linda Morgan, age 52, hopes to retire at 65. Linda expects to need about $75,000 a year for a comfortable retirement, with approximately $25,000–$30,000 coming from Social Security. She will not receive a pension from any employer and has no other obvious source of retirement income. Therefore, Linda will need about $45,000–$50,000 a year from her savings and investment accounts.

Social Security has a “Quick Calculator” at ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/ to help you estimate future Social Security benefits. Also, you can go to https://secure.ssa.gov/RIL/SiView.do to access your Social Security Benefits Statement which shows your actual earnings history and provides an estimate of your future benefits.

Doing the math

How can Linda find “her number,” the amount of financial assets she’ll need to generate $45,000–$50,000 a year in retirement? One tactic is to go online. On our website, www.fmdcpas.com, she’ll find many retirement calculators to crunch the numbers. Click on the “financial tools” tab, and then find “Retirement” under “Financial Calculators”.

Example 2: Linda uses the “Retirement Planner” tool on our website and enters the information from example 1 and other requested data into the calculator. In this hypothetical illustration, Linda is single, earning $100,000 a year, and saving 15% of her earnings for retirement. Her future expectations include salary increases of 2% a year, investment returns of 6%, and 3% inflation (these are entered by clicking on the [+] to the right of “Investment returns, inflation and Social Security), and living until age 95. Linda has $300,000 in current retirement savings.

Changing plans

The good news for Linda is that, with the inputs listed in example 2, her retirement savings will top $880,000 by the time she retires at age 65. The not-so-good news is that Linda’s retirement savings will run out at age 83 if all of those expectations are met. Fortunately, the calculator allows you to modify the data you enter and view the projected results. Some options for Linda include the following:

• Increase her savings rate from 15% to 20%. That would extend her retirement savings to age 86.
• Decrease her desired retirement income from 75% to 70% of current income. Again, her retirement savings would last until age 86.
• Delay retirement from age 65 to 67. This would allow her savings to last until age 90 because Linda would have two more years of earnings, boosting her nest egg over $1 million and taking away two years of relying on her portfolio for support. (Annual Social Security payouts would also increase.)

What if Linda were to do all of the above? Work until age 67, save 20% of her income, and live on 70% of her current earnings in retirement? Now the calculator shows Linda retiring with nearly $1.15 million, tapping her portfolio until age 95, and having nearly $475,000 of portfolio assets remaining.

Fine tuning

With such calculators, there are countless modifications you can make to wind up with a satisfactory plan, at least on paper. In addition, you can go back to the calculator every year or two and update the data to see your current status, as well as make any indicated changes in your retirement plans. As you can see, retirement calculators provide a valuable service, enabling pre-retirees to make informed decisions about working, saving, and spending.

Nevertheless, these calculators may not be able to pinpoint your specific situation, including any plans to work part-time or tap home equity. Our office can go over retirement calculator results with you and suggest possible changes to enhance accuracy. We can also look at your plans in terms of pre-tax and after-tax cash flows, which may provide an even clearer picture of your retirement finances.

Visit our website, www.fmdcpas.com for a variety of additional financial tools, or call us for help.

 

 More Articles:

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Lawmakers from both parties spent much of June debating and discussing tax reform, but without giving many details of what a comprehensive tax reform package could look like before year-end. At the same time, several bipartisan tax bills have been introduced in Congress, which could see their way to passage.


The much-anticipated regulations (REG-136118-15) implementing the new centralized partnership audit regime under the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (BBA) have finally been released. The BBA regime replaces the current TEFRA (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982) procedures beginning for 2018 tax year audits, with an earlier "opt-in" for electing partnerships. Originally issued on January 19, 2017 but delayed by a January 20, 2017 White House regulatory freeze, these re-proposed regulations carry with them much of the same criticism leveled against them back in January, as well as several modifications. Most importantly, their reach will impact virtually all partnerships.


With the release of regulations on centralized partnership audits, many taxpayers hope that it will signal the re-start of a regular flow of much-needed guidance from the Treasury Department and the IRS that has been virtually stopped dead in its tracks since January 20. Others caution that the floodgates have not been opened and that the impact of several Executive Orders in discouraging guidance will be felt well into next year. Also bearing upon the recent lack of guidance are the critical vacancies within Treasury’s Office of Tax Policy that have been taking longer than usual to fill.


No. The IRS continues to treat virtual currency as property for U.S. federal tax purposes. However, last year, a government watchdog, and this year, a group of lawmakers, urged the IRS to clarify its virtual currency guidance.


Every year, millions of post-secondary students access the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This year, the DRT is unavailable for FAFSA filers because of cybersecurity concerns. The information needed to complete the FAFSA can be found on a previously filed federal income tax return.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important federal tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of July 2017.


E-newsletters

Sign Up

Sign up for our monthly newsletters